Young, drunk, and in a sketchy place late at night.

You have probably seen this one but in case you haven’t… An Argentinian woman who works at a bus terminal has had her Facebook post message against slut-shaming and rape culture go viral. The post is brilliant:

“Yesterday at the bus terminal at 6 a.m., there was a drunk man, and ten minutes later he fell into a deep sleep. He had oversized pants that left his underwear and half of his ass exposed.

In sum: young, drunk, late at night, in a sketchy place like the terminal and with his ass in the air… and not I, nor any of the women who passed by this spectacle, raped him or killed him.

You see guys — it’s not so hard, and that no matter how drunk one is or how one is dressed, it’s possible to respect the lives of others???”

“Both men and women should pay less attention to the clothes worn by girls and deal more with teaching boys of future generations to NOT violate, harass, stalk, and kill.”

Read the full article here >

Abortion legislation. Because men should decide what happens to women’s bodies.

A rare mamamia article that actually makes some solid points on the situation where a Democratic Ohio State representative felt she had to share her own experiences of rape and subsequent abortion in order to counter the arguments to those proposing a new bill on abortions.

Because when it comes to women’s rights, women shouldn’t have to put their grief on display in order to be heard.

…it makes women’s participation in these debates conditional on their willingness to reveal sensitive information about themselves first.

…women who do not have, or are not prepared to share personal experiences, are instantly demoted or excluded from discussion.

…the act of disclosure acts as a double-bind, because as soon as a woman is done revealing an intimate aspect of her life, she is immediately at risk of being accused of being biased because of her personal connection to the issue.

…when women are expected to offer their personal narratives, they are often only seen and engaged with on an emotive level (as either a victim or a survivor), while the authority roles of expert and judge remain preserved for men.

The paradox here, is that this only enables men to continue to dominate the conversation, while women are kept on the sidelines.

Read the full article >