So I want to be liked, that doesn’t mean I’m bad at my job.

So so great, this is the problem with ‘The 9 Top Ways Women Give Away Their Power.’ and all those other articles about how women need to ‘lean in’, stop apologising, stop using passive words like ‘just’ (a word I use in probably almost every email, just to soften it):

See, the problem with these sorts of guidelines is the insistence that if women would just assimilate and act more like men, the entire mechanism of misogynistic bias against them would collapse.

Germaine Greer decried this type of feminism; the idea that freedom is found in mimicking men.

I’ve always found it interesting that the qualities that are supposed to make a good manager, qualities like empathy, are the ones that women naturally possess, but are told to tone down in the workplace.

Promotion of authentic power, the kind that doesn’t “leak” out of a woman means valuing not just quotas of women at top levels, but their own way of doing business, as well. In practical terms, this means not demonising a woman for wanting to be liked.

It means accepting that, when it comes to emails, the word “just” or the use of question marks or even an exclamation mark (or four) does not automatically denote powerlessness.

Argh I wish this post would go viral so that this kind of thinking would be encouraged at work.

Let’s stop telling women to modify their behaviour to “get ahead”. Because the quagmire is not with women’s behaviour at work, but the denial and repression of it. Excuse me, I was modifying my language. I meant to say that the way women do business, with humility, empathy and feelings, is already powerful, it’s just that most people are scared s–tless of it.

Read the full article >

Seven anti-feminist headlines you won’t believe were published.

This is brilliant! In this article Clem Bastow takes the stock-standard, idiotic anti-feminist responses to female writers and turns them into clickbait headlines!

She won me over with our mutual dislikes (I can already tell we’re going to be BFFs):

There are two things on the internet that make me descend into an apoplectic fury without fail: witless responses to feminist commentary, and clickbait headlines.

And then shines light on a truth that all female writers know to be true:

If you call yourself a feminist… a guy with a Lars Von Trier-related username will let you know exactly a) what he thinks and b) why you’re wrong.

And then drops in this absolute gem of a reference:

It’s such a widespread and depressingly common occurrence that in 2013, an ‘internet law’, Anita’s Irony, was stated: “Online discussion of sexism or misogyny quickly results in disproportionate displays of sexism and misogyny.”

And this then follows on to her reworking common responses to her feminist musings into clickbait. And my-oh-my would I click (fricken click-bait gets me every time). My favourites below, recognise any familiar sentiments you may have read or unfortunately experienced yourself?:

14 Great Egg Recipes That Celebrate The Anonymous Twitter Accounts That Called Me A Stupid Whore.

This Man’s Story About The Second Cousin Of A Friend Of His From College Will Change Everything You Thought You Knew About Intimate Partner Violence.

Violence Against Women Statistics Are No Match For This Link To A Niche Men’s Interest Blog That Features Animated GIFs Of Fire.

25 Ways In Which These Women Were Definitely Asking For It.

Here’s What Happens When A Dude With No Hobbies Is Given A Laptop And Wifi.

Why Is A Woman Who Claims To Be Single So Determined To Ignore This Unsolicited D–k Pic?

She Deleted His Defamatory Comment On Her Facebook Page, So He Surprised Her With A Fifteen-Message Screed. What Happened Next Will Amaze You.

The only thing I disagree with, and not that it’s explicitly written but implied due to the constant references to men, is that it is only men who write these witless and often aggressive responses. I’ve read some pretty disgusting comments directed to females by females, not to mention the number of female public figures that just say some honestly damn stupid crap that then reaches out to the masses.

Can’t we all just get along?

Read the full article >

Rewarding progress.

Diversity was the theme of the day at the 2015 Emmy’s. A few small steps add up to make positive change on female, racial and transgender rights.

  1. Viola Davis: “The only thing that separates women of colour from anyone else is opportunity. You cannot win an Emmy for roles that are simply not there.”
  2. #AskHerMore meant less ‘who are you wearing’ and more ‘who do you admire’ questions on the red carpet
  3. Andy Samberg called out Donald Trump on his racism
  4. ‘The Amys’ called out the ‘Worst Dressed’ coverage for what it really is
  5. Jon Hamm told it like it was: “People look back on those days through a thick veil of nostalgia, but life was hard if you were anything other than a rich, powerful, white male.”
  6. Uzo Aduba wins for OITNB, again!
  7. Jill Soloway: “People need to make an attempt to find identify and nurture people of colour, women, trans people, queer people, and include them in the creative process.”
  8. Jeffrey Tambor: “I’d like to dedicate my performance and this award to the transgender community. Thank you for your patience. Thank you for your courage. Thank you for your stories. Thank you for our inspiration. Thank you for letting us be part of the change.”

And here’s to more change.

Read the full article.

Apologies for my pregnancy #sorrynotsorry

Once again, our favourite Zoe Saldana is fighting the good fight in hollywood, this time, highlighting the inequality and discrimination against working mothers.

Let me tell you something, it will never be the right time for anybody in your life that you get pregnant. The productions I was slated to work on sort of had a panic. I heard through the grapevine there was even a conversation of me being written off of one of the projects. I was like, ‘Oh, my God, are you kidding me? It’s this bad?’ Right when I just feel super-duper happy, is that inconvenient for you? That me, as a woman in my thirties, I finally am in love and I am finally starting my life? And it’s (screwing) your schedule up? Really?

And then when trying to negotiate a nanny or childcare into her contract, she was met with more discrimination.

[Studio] spend more money sometimes ‘perking’ up male superstars in a movie, a really phat penthouse or them staying in a yacht instead of them staying on land.

But then a woman comes in going, ‘OK, I have a child. You’re taking me away from my home. You’re taking my children away from their home. And you’re going to make me work a lot more hours than I usually would if I was home. Therefore, I would have to pay for this nanny for more hours — so I kind of need that. And they go, ‘Nope, we don’t pay for nannies.’

While Saldana has the means in which to pay for her childcare, it is the principle that she wants highlighted. If a celebrity of her status can’t negotiate childcare into her contract, how on earth are any of the rest of us meant too?

This has been my issue for a long time. Until they find a way for men to incubate a child in their bodies for nine months, women are always going to get pregnant so let’s stop using that as justification of the gender pay gap and start providing more childcare options in and around the workplace.

Read more >

When age matters.

I’m not a morning tv person, have never really watched the Today show and anything I hear about it in the media is always something to do with Karl. That’s why I found this article so interesting on Lisa Wilkinson. She calls out ageism and sexism and isn’t afraid to challenge senior leaders in politics, media or any other field.

At 55,  she’s one of the more mature women on commercial tv (disappointingly), but it is her maturity and life experiences that ‘Today’ show Executive Producer partly contributes to her success, because she’s relatable.

We’ve got a crisis in this country when it comes to domestic violence; our figures, shamefully, are that one woman dies every week at the hands of a partner. We need a minister for women who is not also our prime minister. And we have a gender pay gap that’s the largest it’s been in 20 years. We need to focus on these issues.

[I made] a decision that never again in my life would I allow someone else to determine who I was and what I was capable of.

Read the article >

Fucking outrageous.

Don’t you just love Helen Mirren? She has commented on Hollywood’s sexist, ageist casting with an accurate and succinct “It’s fucking outrageous.”

Mirren spoke at women’s breakfast in New York and when asked to comment on Maggie Gyllenhaal being told by a casting agent that at 37 she was “too old” to play the love interest of a 55-year-old man, Mirren responded quite simply:

It’s fucking outrageous. It’s ridiculous. Honestly.

We all sat there watching, you know… as James Bond got more and more geriatric and his girlfriends got younger and younger.

And she has something to say on being labelled as ‘sexual’ at 69 years young:

I don’t like the word sexual. There are people who are sexual, and who are less sexual. But there’s got to be another word. Sexual is so limiting.

Being powerful is so much more interesting than being beautiful.

*applause*

Read more >

Bikinis and power suits.

Jessica Alba ForbesTalk about girl power! Jessica Alba not only kicked butt on tv show ‘Dark Angel’ and movie ‘The Incredibles’, but she’s also kicking butt in the business world and has made it onto the cover of Forbes magazine.

Speaking at Forbes’ third annual Women’s Summit in New York – where female entrepreneurs and leaders work to change the power imbalance in the business world – Alba spoke of the challenges she face when launching The Honest Company, which sells a range of non-toxic household products and turned over $150 million in revenues last year.

People just saw me as this girl in a bikini in movies kicking butt — maybe not the brightest bulb… It took three and a half years of condescending nods and pats on the back of ‘good luck’, or ‘go back to endorsing things or go do a perfume.’

Well the jokes on them, after only 3 years The Honest Company is currently valued at US$1 billion.

Read more >

I do not belong to anyone but myself.

ariana grande

In an open letter on Twitter and Instagram, Ariana Grande has written an epic response to the constant inquiry into her love life stating:

I’m tired of needing to be linked to a guy, I’m not Big Sean’s ex, I’m not Niall’s new possible girl. I’m Ariana Grande.

What I meant when I said what I said about not being Sean’s ex is that I am tired of living in a world where women are mostly referred to as a man’s past, present or future PROPERTY / POSSESSION. I… do not. belong. to anyone. but myself. and neither do you.

I have come to the realization that I have SO. MUCH. MORE. to talk about. I’m currently making the best music I’ve ever made in my life.

If a woman has a lot of sex (or any sex for that matter)… she’s a ‘slut.’ If a man has sex… HE’S. A. STUD. a BOSSSSS. a KING.

Echoing Taylor Swift’s thoughts on the sexist double standards:

I’m not allowed to date for excitement, or fun, or new experiences or learning lessons. I’m only allowed to date if it’s for a lasting, multiple-year relationship. Otherwise I’m a, quote, ‘serial dater’. Or, quote, ‘boy crazy’.

Here’s to women everywhere being their own, independent selves.

Read more here >

Women in comedy.

women in comedy

I don’t have much to say on this other than watch, just watch. You won’t regret it.

If you’re short on time, I recommend watching Lena Dunham and Tracee Ellis Ross.

Watch them here >

Chess Grandmaster responds to sexist comments.

A female chess legend takes down sexist remarks from Chess master Nigel Short who believes we should simply accept that men’s brains may be wired better for chess than women’s.

Read the take down here >

You misunderstood, it’s a cape not a dress.

#ItWasNeverADress is part of a project launched at the Girls in Tech conference from software company Axosoft to encourage more women into the industry.

It Was Never a Dress is an invitation to shift perceptions and assumptions about women and the audacious, sensitive, and powerful gestures they make every single day.

“In science, technology, arts, mathematics, politics, houses of worship, on the streets, and in our homes, insightful women are often uninvited, overlooked, or just plain dismissed.

“Through storytelling, community building, innovation and creative disruptions, It Was Never a Dress will foster necessary conversations, vital voices, and images from around the world that honor ALL women.”

Read the full article here >

If you want something done, give it to a busy person.

If you took out all the coffee runs, water cooler conversations and quick ‘personal admin’ tasks, how productive would you actually be?

A study by Ernst & Young has found women working part-time are the most productive in the workforce. Or rather, they waste the least amount of time at work of all workers, just 11.1 per cent compared to 14.5 per cent for the rest of the workforce. (Interestingly, they also wasted less time than their male part-time counterparts, who wasted 14.2 percent of their working time.)

Read the full article here >

Don’t tell me there’s no such thing as the gender pay gap.

Sarah SilvermanSarah Silverman doesn’t find the gender pay gap funny. After doing a comedic set in the same show for the same amount of time as a fellow male comedian, he was paid six times more than her for the same job.

“I’m all for women having to work harder to prove themselves at this juncture, if that’s how it is in the world,” she says, “But if you work a job, and a man is working that same job, you should be getting paid the same.”

“It’s [women’s rights topics], that gets the most violent hate-tweets back… [It’s] so odd. [It’s] just bizarre. It creates such a rage in certain people, and of course that comes from fear.”

As highlighted in the article from Pedestrian TV, Australia’s current gender wage gap is at a 20-year high of 18.6%. Very disappointing Australia.

The motherhood penalty.

While some women certainly opt for more ‘family-family’ roles and hours, this social norm impacts those women who want to be the breadwinner and are committed to their career. Such a balenced, well-written article.

Both women and men still expect women to take on the lion’s share of care-giving when children are small, and to take on family-friendly work through the school years. Having fewer women in senior management reinforces the stereotype. Even when couples intend to share parenting, reality bites. Recovering from birth and breastfeeding keeps many women at home longer. There’s even less incentive to rush back to work if the male partner earns more money.

Changes in the corporate landscape have had little impact. Experts say there is an insidious bias against working mothers. “I hear lots of stories of people going on maternity leave and coming back to different roles that are less senior or with less scope.”

“We have a long tradition through the industrial relations system in Australia of protecting the male-breadwinner model,” she says. “That’s breaking down with the need for both parents to work, but we still haven’t fully come to terms with the fact that mothers are working, and how we should to respond to that.”

“…younger women to establish their careers first and have their babies second. “But the truth is, neither sequence is optimal and both involve trade-offs that men do not have to make.”

A senior manager at Origin Energy, with two young children says she has slipped behind her male peers even though she took less than 12 months’ leave and returned to work four days a week. “Motherhood is not a stamp that you’re stuck with,” she says. “The penalty comes when you choose not to go foot to foot with the hours and the travel and the commitment.”

Men who want time out to co-parent are met with raised eyebrows. “The situation traps men as much as it traps women,” says Feenstra. “Many more women in senior management roles would normalise the look of the workforce, which would then make it easier to have the conversation at home.”

“Companies assume that when a woman comes back to work, her commitment is to her family,” O’Reilly says. “But women say, ‘If I am going to come to work and leave my son at home then I want to do something meaningful and that will advance my career.’ It’s a really easy fix. You have to have communications both ways.”

“No one has the perfect solution,” says Marian Baird. “But if men take the same sort of family leave as women, we will see a change. We have to make men as ‘unreliable’ as women.”

Read the full article here >