Seven anti-feminist headlines you won’t believe were published.

This is brilliant! In this article Clem Bastow takes the stock-standard, idiotic anti-feminist responses to female writers and turns them into clickbait headlines!

She won me over with our mutual dislikes (I can already tell we’re going to be BFFs):

There are two things on the internet that make me descend into an apoplectic fury without fail: witless responses to feminist commentary, and clickbait headlines.

And then shines light on a truth that all female writers know to be true:

If you call yourself a feminist… a guy with a Lars Von Trier-related username will let you know exactly a) what he thinks and b) why you’re wrong.

And then drops in this absolute gem of a reference:

It’s such a widespread and depressingly common occurrence that in 2013, an ‘internet law’, Anita’s Irony, was stated: “Online discussion of sexism or misogyny quickly results in disproportionate displays of sexism and misogyny.”

And this then follows on to her reworking common responses to her feminist musings into clickbait. And my-oh-my would I click (fricken click-bait gets me every time). My favourites below, recognise any familiar sentiments you may have read or unfortunately experienced yourself?:

14 Great Egg Recipes That Celebrate The Anonymous Twitter Accounts That Called Me A Stupid Whore.

This Man’s Story About The Second Cousin Of A Friend Of His From College Will Change Everything You Thought You Knew About Intimate Partner Violence.

Violence Against Women Statistics Are No Match For This Link To A Niche Men’s Interest Blog That Features Animated GIFs Of Fire.

25 Ways In Which These Women Were Definitely Asking For It.

Here’s What Happens When A Dude With No Hobbies Is Given A Laptop And Wifi.

Why Is A Woman Who Claims To Be Single So Determined To Ignore This Unsolicited D–k Pic?

She Deleted His Defamatory Comment On Her Facebook Page, So He Surprised Her With A Fifteen-Message Screed. What Happened Next Will Amaze You.

The only thing I disagree with, and not that it’s explicitly written but implied due to the constant references to men, is that it is only men who write these witless and often aggressive responses. I’ve read some pretty disgusting comments directed to females by females, not to mention the number of female public figures that just say some honestly damn stupid crap that then reaches out to the masses.

Can’t we all just get along?

Read the full article >

Our differences are what make us unique individuals.

An insight into the daily life of someone with a disability is somewhat hard to find. While there are numerous chatterings online about feminism, gay and lesbian rights and racism, disability in all its forms is still somewhat kept behind closed doors. That’s why it’s so refreshing when people like Carly have the strength to be vulnerable and write about their challenges (both big and small) in everyday life.

Carly was born with a rare, severe, genetic skin condition called Ichthyosis which makes her skin red, scaly, itchy and painful. On her blog she explains how working in retail helped her take control of how others react to her appearance.

It was so hard being different. I wasn’t disabled enough to get the assistance I needed at school (which was a private space to apply my creams and to be able to sit indoors and read or do craft while the other students swam or played sport). But I was just disabled enough for my peers to call me names, leave me out of activities and avoid sitting on the seat I’d just sat on.

But it was when I turned 17 that things changed… It was the year I got a job, working at a department store for six hours a week after school. It was the year I learnt there was a wider world out there – and people were nicer than I’d experienced at school. Most importantly, I learnt how to handle questions and comments about my appearance in an assertive yet professional way.

And so today, I don’t think I need to turn every question, comment, stare or taunt into an opportunity for education. I don’t like how strangers feel they can intrude on my life by needing to know “what happened?” or why my face is red. Sometimes they ask me about my appearance before they even say hello. I get asked if I’m sunburnt, told I should use aloe vera and I notice people staring metres away.

I only wish they taught this kind of strength and self awareness at school:

My difference is a gift. It’s afforded me so many opportunities – and I’ve met some amazing people. And now when I look in the mirror, I am so happy with the way I look. I almost never want to blend in.

Read the full piece on Carly’s blog >

The rules of feminism and the fear of getting it wrong.

British journalist Polly Vernon’s new book Hot Feminist certainly raises the eyebrows with its title alone, but is not so much about being exclusive as inclusive, to those women who may think that just because they like pink, high heels and dresses means they can’t be taken seriously as a feminist.

It was getting to a point where it seemed like there had to be a feminist angle on absolutely everything and in quite a negative way. I think that was making people disconnect from feminism almost, because they felt it was prescriptive and narrow, that there were all these rules in place. I was talking to women in their late twenties who were feeling angry and tired and bored with it. It didn’t feel like this exciting, joyous, fun thing, which it really should be.

She explores in her book the though that traditional concepts of femininity and feminism are mutually exclusive.

I think it’s an inherently sexist idea. It amazes me that a man is allowed to be a very passionate football fan, that makes him more masculine and interesting and sexy. It doesn’t in any way detract from his intelligence, his work, his morals. Whereas if a woman cares about fashion or pop music, she’s assumed to be lesser, a bit daft, a bit shallow. It basically says the things girls and women like are stupid. That’s hugely sexist. Incredibly girly women can also be incredibly feminist.

I do think we have become increasingly hung up on the minor details, like whether your shoes are too high or your hair is too long. If you shave your legs, if you wax your bikini line, that in no way stops you being angry about the bigger issues of equality.

Feminism is about women earning the right to be as idiotic as men are, quite honestly. I do really silly, messy, immoral, ridiculous things all the time, but none of that means I don’t care about women having equal rights.

Read more >

We are entitled to wear cowboy boots to our own revolution.

beyonceAnother awesome illustrated feminist blog post, this one by illustrator Ellen T. Crenshaw – “We Are Entitled To Wear Cowboy Boots To Our Own Revolution“.

It was a great opportunity, then, to depict women of colour with their own words. It’s incorrect to separate feminism from racial equality as though they were unlinked. I can’t divorce a woman from her race any more than I can divorce her from her femininity; both are part of her identity and together they affect how she is treated in this world.

I can’t personally represent the voice of a woman of color, but in my artistic depictions of diverse women (and men!) I can make an effort to show empathy, respect, and dignity.

I hear you sister!

View more of Crenshaw’s illustrations >

This is one to share with the men in your lives.

That Guy Who Isn’t You‘ is the winning piece in a creative writing contest. It’s a bit of a read so some choice quotes are below.

Part that resonated most:

I am out dancing with my friends and men are imposing their way into our evening uninvited, and they don’t back off until we lie and say our boyfriends are coming, because they will respect an imaginary, made-up man before they respect us.

Key take out to share with your men:

You didn’t speak up. You minded your own business. You let it enter your mind that she deserved it. You looked at pictures not meant for your eyes. You believed him because he’s a nice guy. You looked away. You felt uncomfortable but not enough to say anything. You dismissed it as a joke. You ignored all of those times you saw things that you knew weren’t right and you didn’t make it your problem. Instead you made it mine, and you’re not listening to me now, you’re just waiting for your turn to talk – so yes, you are right it was not you.”

One call out – there is a section where it’s implied that prostitution is violence against woman. This mindset is not supported by Dirty words as feminism means supporting a woman’s right to make her own life choices. Apart from this, it’s worth a read.